Steppenwolf Theatre’s 2010-11 Season

I’ve missed writing about other season announcements, but I’ll write about Steppenwolf’s because I’m remembering to do so (I’ve been busy unpacking and dealing with angry mothers) and I was outrageously ebullient at 9 p.m.. (I didn’t read it when the Tribune posted it at 8:57, three minutes before the embargo was up.)

The theme for Steppenwolf’s 2010-11 season is the public/private self, which is a relevant thing to examine in the day of social networking. For more info, visit Steppenwolf’s website and/or the post on Time Out Chicago’s blog.

Steppenwolf has planned an interesting season that will, at the very least, make me visit Chicago regularly. A new play by Lisa D’Amour that Steppenwolf commissioned, a play by Lanford Wilson (their production of his play Blam in Gillead in 1980 was, er, landmark.), the transfer of a play from their First Look Repertory and a new Will Eno play. (I like Thom Pain (based on nothing). I’m not sorry.)

Oh, and Tracy Letts and Amy Morton in Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? FTW! (See, Steppenwolf can get me to use FTW.)

Here’s the word from the Steppenwolf folks.

September 9 – November 7, 2010
Detroit
A new play by Lisa D’Amour
Featuring ensemble members Kate Arrington and Robert Breuler
In the Steppenwolf Downstairs Theatre

Picture-perfect couple Ben and Mary fire up the grill to welcome the new neighbors who’ve moved into the long-empty house next door. Three barbeques later, the fledgling friendship veers out of control, shattering Ben and Mary’s carefully maintained semblance of success—with comic, unexpected consequences. Detroit is a fresh, off-beat look at what happens when we dare to open ourselves up to something new.

December 2, 2010 – February 6, 2011
Edward Albee’s
Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
Directed by Pam MacKinnon
Featuring ensemble members Tracy Letts and Amy Morton
In the Steppenwolf Downstairs Theatre

On the campus of a small New England college, George and Martha invite a new professor and his wife home for a nightcap. As the cocktails flow, the young couple finds themselves caught in the crossfire of a savage marital war where the combatants attack the self deceptions they forged for their own survival. Ensemble members Tracy Letts and Amy Morton face off as one of theatre’s most notoriously dysfunctional couples in Albee’s hilarious and harrowing masterpiece.

January 20 – May 15, 2011
Sex with Strangers
By Laura Eason
Directed by associate artist Jessica Thebus
Featuring ensemble member Sally Murphy with Stephen Louis Grush
In the Steppenwolf Upstairs Theatre

Ethan is a hot young writer whose online journals of “sexcapades” are the buzz of the blogosphere. Olivia is an attractive 30-something whose own writing career is fizzling. They hook up, sex turns into dating and dating into something more complicated. A break-out hit at Steppenwolf’s 2009 First Look Repertory, Sex with Strangers explores how we invent our identity – online and off – and what happens when our private lives become public domain.

March 24 – May 29, 2011
The Hot L Baltimore
By Lanford Wilson
Directed by ensemble member Tina Landau
Featuring ensemble members Alana Arenas, K. Todd Freeman and Yasen Peyankov
In the Steppenwolf Downstairs Theatre

The Hotel Baltimore used to be the swankiest place in town—now it has a date with the wrecking ball. Eviction notices just went out to its residents, who live on the fringes of society and call the seedy hotel home. This acclaimed play from the author of Balm in Gilead is filled with everyday humanity—unexpectedly intimate and moving. Helmed by visionary director Tina Landau, Hot L Baltimore reveals the private lives of an unconventional community about to be turned inside out.

June 16 – August 14, 2011
Middletown
A new play by Will Eno
Directed by Les Waters
Featuring ensemble member Alana Arenas
In the Steppenwolf Downstairs Theatre

Mary Swanson just moved to Middletown. About to have her first child, she is eager to enjoy the neighborly bonds a small town promises. But life in Middletown is complicated: neighbors are near strangers and moments of connection are fleeting. Middletown is a playful, poignant portrait of a town with two lives, one ordinary and visible, the other epic and mysterious.

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